Catalogue raisonné of Grant Artworks. (Prototypes. Displaying 1 to 18 of 65)

Catalogue raisonné of artworks by

 

 

 

Page one of artworks from the 3rd Collection (Prototype Series) by Grant, shown alongside some formative works from his Organic Tales collection and Formal Design period.  (Page two)

Background:

The Prototype Series, was inspired by a question from Mihaela Enea. The second in this series, Lost in Eschire‘ – in Space, nobody cares about your vanishing points, your lost horizons and your fixed views (Cat. no. L1 002 below), will be exhibited in Grant’s new exhibition “In between the Lines”  which is presently in studio production.

 'Lost in Eschire' (in Space, nobody cares about your vanishing points, your lost horizons and your fixed views) <> 2017 <> Ink on paper <> 30 x 20cm <> unsigned <>WoW Collection

Originally conceived as a collection of interwoven Google Tilt brush VR paint sculpts, this design was prepared as a series of drawings pre-planned to connect.
Useless Pencil.  c. 2013. Pencil on paper.  30 x 20cm.

 

 

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“Land turnover” . c. 2014. 30 x 20cm. Ink linework and pencil on paper.
Pencil sketch for ‘The Parade of Obstacles to Themselves Part 1’
Part of a design for a small sculpt in pottery to depict the microscopic fungal growth thriving in a kitchen compost heap.
Pencil sketch for ‘The Parade of Obstacles to Themselves Part 2’

 

Cat. no. FD 001   > ‘Materials Causeway’ Towards the end of Grant’s Formal Design period, he was invited to depict trade stands for West Midlands Development Corp. and an exhibition stand for the Atlantic Salmon Trust. These commissions gave Grant a freedom to design eye-catching temporary structures and in this example shown above, there are many design elements which later surfaced in his ‘Prototypes Collection’.
A series of structural line forms originally designed to be constructed as hides, mounds and wildlife habitats nestling in the landscape to interest  and educate visitors walking around a new community led woodland and food growing project

 

 

Art’s role in shifting perspectives

“Art, for it to become useful, need only shift one viewer’s perspective” (Grant 2009).

During Grant’s Art Therapy outreach work, that viewer can be the artist.
In Grant’s public art shows, viewers are both the audience and a potential market.

Studio opportunities exist to draw but so few opportunities present themselves to share art directly with individuals who may appreciate it. During a recent Literary Festival, Grant had such a chance and was able to gift a new ink pen drawing of his letterforms to someone whose love of lettering shone so brightly from his carving folio and flowed so enthusiastically with his live spoken words.

Moments of such sharing have untold use and for Grant, they have always been part of his language. Lettering creates its own beauty, whether the letters forms words or combine to make shapes (letterforms).

Below is a pencil drawing, by Grant, of a sculpt which may not have seen the page had the sculptor not indulged themselves in the freedom of using wet clay.  On Grant’s Twitter is a video of an unfired clay sculpt under a gentle rain shower – one which returned the clay to slip but gave rise to the artform of the decay-video.

Such morphing of shape, material and message is a central theme through many of Grant’s recent artworks – many of which will soon be available for tour.

Interested Galleries should contact us directly for progress news and all publicity previews and interviews they need.