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Projects and Ideas : South Coast Snails / SnailsRus

South Coast Snails / SnailsRus

South Coast Snails / SnailsRusThe Last time we had a good weekend chat at the HoBB about snail farming ( heliciculture ) seems ages ago but it was good to compare notes with Val Cornford from South Coast Snails (SnailsRus) who remarked on leaving, "I'm all 'charged again' now, which is exactly what I wanted". What better results could you ever wish for after a visit to 'HoBB Real'.

When I was still wearing short trousers, I collected sea shells everytime I went onto a beach and even the occassional garden snail. I can't say I was too keen on the creatures inside so would pick them up slowly to make sure their owners were out at the time - Conchologist tendencies rather than Malacologist I was told. Funnily enough, I have kept my interest in shells but now also like the mussel creatures inside especially when cooked in a little wine, cream and garlic.

I mention this because I am ever curious about the changing state of the UK snail farming industry. I have tried plain home made escargot but my tastebuds needed the garlic recipe. One day I hope to be invited to the South of France and experience escargot how it should be prepared so I'm open to invitations if anyone out there knows the secret.

There's one UK Snail farm just South of here at Credenhill and I keep up to date by exchanging thoughts and ideas with two UK heliciculture enthusiasts but despite the market demand being over the supply, the whole UK scene is a shadow of what it was. If anyone can throw some light on the main reasons why it's not more common in this country, please let me know. Maybe, like me, we Brits enjoy shells when their owners are away, especially the gardeners amoungst us!

Waves ~~~~~~~~~ <+))))))))>< ~~~ Grant

Whoops, before I go for a cup of fair trade coffee, did I mention that computer scientists are looking at the information laid down by slugs and snails within their slime tracks? Apparently, they embed a code in the slime to tell others that cross their path a whole load of information about where they have been and what was there. The slime film of data is so thin that it might give clues to how we can create biological computers to overcome the physical size limits of silicon chips.

More waves ~~~~ and I'll try a graphic snail : _ _ ____(_)@o" instead of a fish.

Posted by : Grant
Filed in : Projects and Ideas

Posted By grant at 12.09 AM on 11/May/2010.

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