Gallery examples (Pencil. Ink. Colour stages)

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Finished Artwork (Book Cover)

A gallery selection of our artwork.

We work for architects, publishers, manufacturers,
marketing & PR studios, film makers, writers, photographers
and lecturers.

Add us to your list of freelance creative designers.  We accept briefs online or attend meetings when in UK.

We also provide a rare service for visiting authors who enjoy having the run of our studio and gardens where they can explore book image ideas and get help on their next cover design/s. This is by arrangement with your literary agent, publisher or directly with us.

Strand of Hair ice crystal formation
We have a large image library, which includes the WoW Picture archive.
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We pencil sketch at live meeting, do colour samples in studio, inkwork by hand – either on paper or digitally. Colour render digitally.
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Left: Inking service. Right: Colour Render Service
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Pencilwork used as school colouring sheet
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Mascot toon. Ebano.
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Ink Sketching (no prior pencil stage)
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Colour Rendering (Photoshop)

Art’s role in shifting perspectives

“Art, for it to become useful, need only shift one viewer’s perspective” (Grant 2009).

During Grant’s Art Therapy outreach work, that viewer can be the artist.
In Grant’s public art shows, viewers are both the audience and a potential market.

Studio opportunities exist to draw but so few opportunities present themselves to share art directly with individuals who may appreciate it. During a recent Literary Festival, Grant had such a chance and was able to gift a new ink pen drawing of his letterforms to someone whose love of lettering shone so brightly from his carving folio and flowed so enthusiastically with his live spoken words.

Moments of such sharing have untold use and for Grant, they have always been part of his language. Lettering creates its own beauty, whether the letters forms words or combine to make shapes (letterforms).

Below is a pencil drawing, by Grant, of a sculpt which may not have seen the page had the sculptor not indulged themselves in the freedom of using wet clay.  On Grant’s Twitter is a video of an unfired clay sculpt under a gentle rain shower – one which returned the clay to slip but gave rise to the artform of the decay-video.

Such morphing of shape, material and message is a central theme through many of Grant’s recent artworks – many of which will soon be available for tour.

Interested Galleries should contact us directly for progress news and all publicity previews and interviews they need.

Pop-up Museum of Shape & Form

“Vanishing points and delineation lines, like lake ripples from stone skippings, will one day be rendered unseen by nature’s overtaking green.”  (Grant)

The work of Grant grows within a seasonally changing landscape of trees, rivers and pathways.  As a designer, Grant shapes the new, which is subject to manufacturing requirements, materials, space, time, perception, costs,  future trends  and the art of balancing consumer demands with those of business growers. But as an artist, Grant creates works of infinite variation in purely pictorial space.

“To design is  to plan and to organize, to order, to relate and to control. In short it embraces all means opposing disorder and accident. Therefore it signifies a human need and qualifies man’s thinking and doing”  (Josef Albers)

Grant’s model of the Earth is layered chance. “Life tries to re-order slime”, he wrote in a school art essay.

It is interesting that whilst Grant enjoys working on projects that have clear structure and set frames of reference, he delights in shifting his eye to the open space between lines where so much more can be shared by teasing the eye and rippling the mind.

Further reading:

Josef Albers / Despite Straight Lines ‘An analysis of his graphic constructions by Francois Bucher’. [Pub. Yale University Press. 1961]

Vasarely. Plastic Arts of the 20th Century. Collection Ed. Marcel Joray [Pub Editions du Griffon Neuchatel, 1969)

(Hats off to Vasarely and Albers – from the Pop-up Museum of Shape & Form)
(Handworn, dented, creased doing tools – from the Pop-up Museum of Shape & Form)