British Image Group

In films, vlogs, tweets, augmented reality, print, and on the streets, image hits the brain faster than words.

British Image Group archived site at http://web.archive.org/web/20041213012802/http://www.geocities.com:80/big_uk_2002/art_science.html

The British Image Group was founded in the early 1987 before the ease of online folio publishing. It’s background is now archived

Most of its founding members (list below) now have their own websites or connect through HBC (HoBB Publishing Community)  and Jacketflap.

But if you are a new writer, illustrator, editor or book designer and need some experience in publishing, you can apply to  become an HBC intern or a goalshare partner at Little People Books and we will share all we know with you.


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News

Children’s Book Illustrator, Camilla Zaza, was asking about Illustration Agencies and whether it was a good idea to get an agent.

My reply :

“Picture editors like choice. They collect and retain their own records of illustration styles whilst on the look out for ever fresher ones. Your best aim is to find the picture editors that want to use your style but here’s another aim you might like to consider ….

Imagine what it’s like for a picture editor. They get emails, cards, flyers, calls, visits and sometimes presents from illustrators. They get a lot. To be noticed as an illustrator, proof reader or designer, you need to stick out from the crowd.

One very well known picture editor who loved my work but never used it, told me this : “Grant, I have an illustrator that does wonderful figurative work in pencil. I have another that produces the slickest photoshop work on car engines and everything mechanical. Every illustrator I use has a set talent I can depend upon for specific contract requirement. Go away and only come back when I can place you in my mind as a specialist. There are thousands of illustrators who have great bulging folios of their work, but unless their work burns into my memory on first view, they stand no chance of working with me.”

So yes. I went away and specialised. However, I returned three years later to find the contact had retired.

Another editor once told me: “I like to enjoy my work. I use illustrators I like. It’s not just about the standard of their illustration, it’s about the whole process of putting the team together, producing the book, launching it and celebrating its popularity and sales. Once we know an illustrator and enjoy knowing them as a person, they become part of the team.”

So agents? Some are great. Most are busy. Many spend all their time devoted to getting contracts for those illustrators already on their books.

Self promotion? You can do this in a standard way or better still, you can stick out from the crowd and get noticed.

Is there a third way? Yes. In this plug-and-play world, more authors are teaming with illustrators and designers to create near perfect finished books (pdf format), excluding the legal page. An editor can scan these very quickly and spot an illustrator’s skill at adding image to story.

Is there a fourth way? I’m sure there are many more ways for illustrators, authors, designers, photographers, film makers and publishers to combine and create tomorrow’s world of entertainment, education and effective communication.

My recipe – sharing all through the HoBB Publishing Community.

British Image Group Founding Members:  Arlene Adams; Andrew Atkins; Lisa Bond; Hilary Brynston; Rob Chapman; Philip Cumpstone; Brendon Deacey; John Dunne; Gary Dunning; Paul France; Yvonne Harrington; (The Late Great) Jonathan Inglis; Grant Jesse; Phil Kenning; Linda Lewis; Sara Hayward; ; Petra Rohr-Rouendaal; Paul Russell; Cathy Simpson; Lynne Willey; Ollie Tomlinson; Peter Scott.

ELF : “We want every young enthusiastic reader to be able to pick up any of our five books and read them from cover to cover without the help of an adult.”

000229PROJECT:
Improving English literacy in primary schools.

With the English Literacy Foundation, we have developed five fully decodeable storybooks. These books are  very useful tools for keen pre-school readers because every word used in them is simple to pronounce once you know the easiest 22 sounds (phonemes) in the English language.

The books do include a few long words but even these have been carefully selected so that the new reader can work out exactly how to pronounce them by themselves. When I was still at primary school I took great delight in learning the longest word in Welsh (Llanfair­pwllgwyngyll­gogery­chwyrn­drobwll­llan­tysilio­gogo­goch) and every class mate on seeing Mary Poppins had memorised:

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.

I still don’t know what it means but such long words are irresistibly efficacious and can dumb fuddle the wisest of parents.

Author, Dr. J. Ford ( AKA ‘Bodkin’) found the five stories a challenge to write because words like “the” could not be used – although simple, it is hard to pronounce “the” when you are just starting on the road to mastering the English language.

“We want every young enthusiastic reader to be able to pick up any of our five books and read them from cover to cover without the help of an adult, and that’s the sure way to engage young minds and give them a sense of achievement. After reading one book, without assistance, the new avid reader will be hungry for more.”

As most of the best selling books for very early readers include some hard words, we went in the opposite direction and just used the easiest words to create a more relaxed and enjoyable reading experience.

Posted by Grant.


 

ELF books (22 phonemes) published by littlepeoplebooks.co.uk

  • PROJECT UPDATE >
    On Amazon the first title “On Robin Hill” (Paperback) sells at £7.99p+ £2.80 (UK delivery)
    Amazon are listing an “Orange Second Series” title “Mister Porter’s Alarm Clock” (Paperback) £5.17p+ £2.80 (UK delivery) which was only ever printed in demo.  form. Ten copies of this exist Worldwide which may explain why they are being offered by some collectors at a far higher price.
    As some of the characters from the first five books make a come back appearance in a series of ten books written using all 44+ phonemes, all reprinted covers of the first five include the words “22 Phonemes” in bold.

 

  • Early  comments:

Julie Craddock “an avid reader” on 27 May 2009
“The kids loved it. THEY read to ME for a change. I liked the pictures but the story was way above my intellectual level! Now I am being nagged to get more books in the series. A boxed set would be nice then I wouldn’t have to check which they have got already. I think this is going to be a kind of 21st century Beatrix Potter collection.”

anotherreader on 16 January 2009
“At last a proper phonic reading scheme. Real stories with carefully chosen vocabulary. The pictures are fabulous. Highly recommended.”

V. Linnetton 29 May 2009
“I bought this book as I wanted to provide more fiction stories that my son can read himself. However, the words may be phonetic, but are not the sort used in everyday life. I think it is unreasonable to expect a child to read words that he has never heard of, just because they can be sounded out.  I shall stick to Kipper, Floppy and the Oxford Reading Tree



Foreign Right buyers:
Primary and secondary worldwide rights, including movie rights, television rights, merchandising rights, foreign translation rights and new technologies rights available.