Doing a Mind Map

When Lesley Morrissey visited The HoBB, she introduced me to mindmapping as a handy tool and now I use mindmaps regularly to  remember stories whilst on stage.
During live storytelling events, I have used props, sticky pad notes, images, word cards and conventional lists, but when my brain has to hold hundreds and even thousands of story threads, it helps me to see a ‘map’ of the whole woven story whilst performing it – a map which includes links, associations and key points.
Mind maps are there to remind me of the bare story bones as I work with audiences to branch out and elaborate on plots. And as every project has its own story, mind maps come in especially useful when organisations need to communicate involved issues over a short time.
Here are four mind maps I produced with the help of friends and volunteers for a local community group:

Metamorphic images

“Something’s happening and it’s happening right now” sang the Stranglers in “Something Better Change”
Some people are still too blind to see it but others grapple with change to make sure it’s for the better.

We grapple at The HoBB.

We grapple over breakfast, through each day, and by the log fires deep into the night. We grapple with ways to communicate change and to help people understand change. We grapple with changes that are hard to stomach and those that themselves need changing.

We do this by thinking of the unexpected, flying in the face of the normal, diving into ever new action and ever-moving forward.  As change can be a slow boat, we research and find ways to speed it up. Over one fast-moving morning, we focused on metamorphic image and here’s about 5% of the results:

We’re here for the open-minded and very practical grapplers. Change your views with us and work to change ours.